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Posts Tagged ‘dog behavior’

by guest blogger Claire Jorge

Planning to get a puppy is something that truly puts a spark of excitement in dog lovers; and the first time that you see and hold your puppy is not only a thrilling moment, but a happy one as well. You spend the day playing and cuddling your puppy, and getting so much pleasure out of the experience; and then came the puppy’s first night away from its mother. You put your puppy in its place, preparing it for bed. You put water and maybe a few toys to keep it occupied during the night. You turn off the lights and go to bed. Then, the whining starts. When this happens, you do everything to make it stop. But are you doing it correctly? Also, why is the dog whining in the first place?

Apart from growling and barking, another way that dogs communicate with humans is by whining. There are different reasons why puppies or dogs whine. Before you employ means to discipline your dog or call Cesar Millan, it is best to understand why it’s whining in the first place. This way, you’ll know how to approach the problem the right way. Remember that various breeds are pretty impressionable and doing the wrong thing could actually exacerbate instead of improve the problem.

Like kids, puppies also cry when they miss their moms. This is demonstrated through whining, particularly on its first night in a new home. Dogs also whine, and there are various reasons for this as well. It may be due to pain, anxiety or they may be in need of something, such as food, water or attention. So, here are a few things that could help your puppy get more comfortable; and thus, reduce or alleviate whining. These tips are also useful for those with more mature dogs.

Create a Warm and Comfortable Environment

Make sure that your puppy has a warm and comfortable place to sleep in. Puppies often cuddle with their moms and siblings, and they are so used to being enveloped by something warm. Keeping puppies warm is also necessary since these animals are too young to have enough fat or fur that helps in protecting them from extreme cold.

Let It Know You’re Nearby

If possible, don’t leave a new puppy outside. Have it somewhere near where it can smell your presence. A puppy may whine because it feels unsafe or unsure. Hence, having the scent of its pack leader, which is you, nearby, will help in calming it down. Try putting the puppy’s crate in your room or have it snuggle in a shirt or any cloth that has your scent. If the whining doesn’t stop, ignore it. Don’t have the dog sleep in bed with you as it will learn that whining means that it will then be taken to your bed.

Bladder Control

Puppies are small and their bodily systems aren’t exactly mature yet. This is why their bladders only hold a small amount of urine. So, when your puppy whines, it could mean that it needs to go to the toilet. You may have to take your puppy outside to do its business every two hours. Though it may seem like a lot of work, it’s a great way to toilet train your puppy at a very early age.

Upset Dog

A dog can get upset if it senses that something is not right with its environment. Maybe someone it doesn’t recognize is close by or maybe he is worried about the presence of another animal. As a dog owner, it’s important to learn how to differentiate your dog’s whines so that it will become easier for you to know why it’s whining and address the problem appropriately.

Anxious Dog

Dogs also experience separation anxiety. When they do, they express this through whining. It’s a vocalization that they want to become reunited with their owners.

Dog in Pain

Dogs in pain also whine. When your dog suddenly whines for no apparent reason, have it checked by a vet. It may be in pain or maybe it’s not feeling well.

Claire Jorge is a skilled vet who regularly contributes helpful blogs to recognized animal websites. She provides guidance to pet owners, basing her advice on her experiences at Miami Animal Hospital. She currently lives with her beautiful Akitas, Betsy and Mae, which are well-trained protection dogs.

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by guest blogger Dr. Susan Wright, DMV

Puppy needs attention

We see it all so often that it almost seems natural, but no matter how often we see a dog chasing a car, we all still wonder what is going on in the dog’s brain to make him want to chase a car. While we know a dog’s mind is not as developed as a human brain — which is why it is so important to consistently train your dog with positive reinforcement — we ponder at what the panting dog, chasing after the car is doing or hoping to accomplish.

Fulfilling a Natural Desire

Well the act may seem natural because in fact it is natural. Dogs are connected in their long 

line of genealogy to wild dogs and even in some cases wolves. No matter how domesticated they are, these past connections give dogs inkling to have an enhanced prey drive. Simply put, dogs automatically are attracted to things that are moving away from them and they want to chase it. Be it a tennis ball, a rope toy, Frisbee, kids riding bikes, joggers or cars driving past, if the dog is free and able they will likely chase it/them.

Achieving an Adrenaline Rush

Today’s dogs are far enough removed that the chase is not about a kill in the end result, more of just a fun adrenaline rush for the dog to do his best to chase the object and even try to entice it/them in a game of chase. If you have been to a dog park or had a doggie play date lately, you know firsthand how excited dogs get when they are participating in an intense, friendly game of tag. They enjoy the chase, the catch and then want to play repeatedly. This act is all related back to their natural instinct of having a prey drive.

Training, Safety Precautions & Exercise

So the next time you see a dog chasing a car you can rest assured that, while the act is dangerous, it is natural for the dog. Responsible dog owners should do their best to work with dogs to change this behavior through training and the use of safety measures like installing an invisible fence around their property to help keep their dog safe and within the allowed roaming area. However, no amount of safety precautions should ever be enough to leave your dog roaming around outside without the owner monitoring their dog.
Unfortunately, there is always a chance that the first time a dog escapes it could be their last time, especially if the dog is a car chaser! Rather, owners should spend outdoor time with their dog together and even spark their natural need to chase by starting a game of chase with their four-legged best pal! Not only will the act help fulfill the dog’s natural tendency and need to chase, the time spent is great exercise for both the owner and the dog – a win-win as they spend quality time with one another, getting back to the basics of why they adopted a dog in the first place!

Dr. Susan Wright DMV is a seasoned veterinarian, a wireless dog fence expert. Dr. Wright and her staff provide informative information to dog owners on how to provide a safe dog environment.

Photo courtesy: http://www.sunnydayphotos.com

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